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Displaying 11 - 15 of 112
Nov
30
Clinicians
Fellows/Trainees
Nurses
Pharmacists
Technicians

Ictal Semiology SIG | Case Studies in Seizure Semiology

Convention Center, Room 295, Second Floor
1:30 PM-3:00 PM

In this SIG, clinical cases are presented in videos of seizures to illustrate how seizure semiology can be used in the localization of seizure onset and routes of ictal propagation. The panel and the audience are challenged in the detailed examination of seizure semiology with 4-6 cases of typical or unusual seizures.  In addition, clinical responses to cortical stimulation will be presented to further elucidate eloquent areas of the brain in relationship to seizure semiology. The audience is invited to examine the seizures and stimulation responses to form hypotheses. The

Nov
30
Behavioral Health Providers
Clinicians
Fellows/Trainees
Nurses
Pharmacists
Scientists
Technicians

Professional Wellness in Epilepsy Care SIG | Professional Burnout in Health Professionals Caring for Persons with Epilepsy

Convention Center, Room 292, Second Floor
1:30 PM-3:00 PM

Work-related burnout is prevalent in all of society with the highest rates in healthcare professionals which continue to increase in recent years. Burnout in caregivers has shown a significant negative correlation with health outcomes in patients. Neurologists rank highly in rates of burnout compared to other specialties. The issues contributing to burnout and potential interventions in the subspecialty of epilepsy have not been systematically studied. This forum will allow the gathering of information to determine the causes of burnout from speakers and participants and discuss potential solutions and possible collaborations

Nov
30
Clinicians
Fellows/Trainees
Pharmacists
Scientists
Technicians

Temporal Lobe Club SIG | Noninvasive Recording of Pathological High Frequency Oscillations

Convention Center, Room 278, Second Floor
1:30 PM-3:00 PM

High Frequency Oscillations (HFOs), as recorded from intracerebral electrodes in the EEG of experimental animals and of epileptic patients, have proven a solid indicator of the epileptogenic zone and a possible biomarker of epileptogenicity. HFOs are usually separated into ripples, from 80 to 250Hz and fast ripples, from 250 to 500Hz. Although much less frequent, epilepsy-related ripples have been recorded non-invasively with scalp EEG and with MEG, and recently fast ripples were recorded in infants in the context of epilepsy related to tuberous sclerosis. The SIG session will review the

Nov
30
Behavioral Health Providers
Clinicians
Fellows/Trainees
Nurses
Pharmacists
Scientists

Tuberous Sclerosis SIG | Neurocognitive Comorbidities of Epilepsy in TSC: Overlapping Mechanisms and Therapeutic Strategies

Convention Center, Room 293, Second Floor
1:30 PM-3:00 PM

Epilepsy is a common neurological manifestation of TSC and is frequently associated with other neurocognitive comorbidities, such as intellectual disability, autism, and sleep disorders. Seizures may contribute to cognitive deficits, behavioral problems and sleep issues. In turn, sleep disorders and other comorbidities may exacerbate epilepsy. Increasing evidence suggests that overlapping mechanisms exist between epilepsy and its comorbidities in TSC, which may provide targeted therapeutic strategies for addressing multiple neurological manifestations of TSC. In this SIG, the clinical and pathophysiological features of cognitive deficits, autism, and sleep disorders in TSC will

Nov
30
Fellows/Trainees
Nurses
Pharmacists
Scientists
Technicians
CME and CE Educational Credit

Spanish Symposium | Controversies in the Management of Refractory Epilepsy

Convention Center, Room 288, Second Floor
3:30 PM-6:00 PM

Over the past decade, several new medical and surgical treatments have been developed and approved for use in medically-refractory epilepsy. There is no consensus on treatment algorithms for this group of patients. This symposium will consist of a discussion of treatment options in three types of patients with medically-refractory epilepsy. The first case involves treatment options of patients with primary generalized epilepsy, with emphasis on women of childbearing potential; the two other cases involve a patient with non-lesional extra-temporal epilepsy and a patient with lesional, dominant, and non-dominant temporal lobe